Ceasefire in Syria is exposing real nature of “moderate” rebels

This video illustrates the international nature of the terrorist opposition in Syria.

The new cessation of hostilities agreement for Syria, brokered by the US and the Russian Federation, may have only a small chance of success – although let’s hope it does work. But one thing it has done is clarify the nature of the “opposition” in Syria and the problem the US has with its chosen proxies in that country.

The US and its NATO allies have long claimed they are supporting the “moderate opposition.” And that support has included finance and arms. The have also condemned the actions of the aerospace forces of the Russian federation – claiming the Russians are targeting the “moderate” rebels, the US allies, instead of the terrorist groups – Daesh and Jabhat Fateh Al-Sham, the formerly named Al Nusra (The UN describes both of these groups as terrorist).

The US has now been forced to admit that their “moderate” rebels are intricately entwined with the terrorist groups. That these groups fight together, often share the same command and territory. In fact, the recent attacks in the large battles raging around the major Syrian city of Aleppo have involved the  “Army of Conquest” where the “moderate” rebels and terrorist groups have united under the command of Jabhat Fateh Al-Sham (the terrorist Al Nusra group).

The US is acknowledging that their pleas for the “moderate” rebels to distance themselves from the terrorists have fallen on deaf ears. US Secretary of State John Kerry has even suggested that those “moderate” rebels who do not distance themselves will now be subject to US bombing if the cessation of hostilities can last for 7 days.

Some “moderate” rebels have accepted the cessation of hostilities agreement – but many haven’t. Over 20 groups recently announced their rejection in a document presented by the Free Syrian Army (supported and financed by the US).

fsa-rejection

Over 20 militant groups in Syria have rejected the US-Russian brokered ceasefire. Credit:Over 20 militant groups reject the Syrian ceasefire agreement.”

This announcement was made by the Free Syrian Army but many of the groups rejecting the ceasefire are not a part of that group’s umbrella. These groups claim:

“the major reasons for the rejection of the ceasefire is that it benefits the Syrian Army more so than their own militant factions. They also state that because it excludes Jabhat Fateh Al-Sham, formerly known as al-Nusra, from the ceasefire, they cannot agree to those terms.”

Perhaps if these agreements do fail (as many if not most commentators expect) they will still have left one success. The clear identification of most of the so-called “moderate” rebels with their terrorist allies – Daesh and Jabhat Fateh Al-Sham. Hopefully, this will make claims that Russian attacks on terrorist groups are actually attacks on “our” “moderate” rebels a thing of the past.

Surely that would be progress.

Similar articles

 

27 responses to “Ceasefire in Syria is exposing real nature of “moderate” rebels

  1. Has this article been written by Vladimir Putin?

    Like

  2. Please be aware that the video bears the statement: “Posted by the Syrian Republic”, that is Assad’s regime.

    Like

  3. Make up your mind, Walter. Did the Russian president or the Syrian president write my article? I would be flattered either way but I can assure you the work is mine.

    But are you attempting to find some way to excuse these terrorist groups? Do you question their international nature? Do you support their rejection of the US-Russia brokered ceasefire?

    Like

  4. I agree with your Synopsis,it is a step in the right direction,..the ‘moderates’ who do not stop all fighting will be seen as terrorists,and attacked by the US/Russian axis..

    Liked by 1 person

  5. David do you support the advance of Islamisation in the Middle East, Iraq, Libya then Syria? What threatens you about Syria and Assad which allow a range of religions to exist under a government which is not religion-based?

    Like

  6. Paul, if Donald Trump becomes the USA president his policy is to cooperate with Putin and be very tough on terrorists. But that is a great worry to some Hillary Clinton supporters [military industrial oil types] who have not been conned into believing that the terrorists are not an agent of USA. Clinton has been part of the USA machine “accidentally” giving weapons to the terrorists.

    Like

  7. David Fierstien

    Ken: “Make up your mind, Walter. Did the Russian president or the Syrian president write my article? I would be flattered either way . . ”

    I hope you are joking. “Since Vladimir Putin came to power in 1999 there has been an increased crackdown on freedoms of expression, assembly and association in Russia. Putin’s 2012 landslide victory sparked even an even greater repression of rights following the large protests after his re-election.” http://www.amnestyusa.org/russia/

    It’s odd that someone who runs a blog that invites debate would consider a champion of the “crackdown on freedoms of expression,” a role model.

    Like

  8. David, considering I have given space as guests to people like Paul Connett on this blog – of course, I would be honoured to accept a guest article from either, or both, the Russian or Syrian Presidents. I, of course, would treat them the same way as I treated Connett – rationally pointing our their mistakes if I thought them wrong in any way. And it the comments section you would be able to raise specific charges against either of the guest bloggers – and hopefully, they would have the time to discuss these with you.

    One can but dream. Guest bloggers like these would do wonders for my reader numbers.

    However, in such a discussion I would hope you would be more serious in you contributions than simply provide links as if they meant the end of the discussion. That is just too much like those anti-fluoride commenters I get who think such links mean the discussion has been settled in their favour for all time. I have never considered such attitudes at all sensible.

    Like

  9. Ah . . I misunderstood. When you said you would be flattered if your words were attributed to either of them.

    Regarding my submission of links as if they were the end of a discussion: I have provided you with several links to Amnesty International reports to support my positions. I specifically asked you if you could show me that AI is politically biased in any way. Since you failed to answer that question, I took it to mean that you conceded that your objection to my citing of sources like AI was not critical or reliable. And I said that. You did not object a second time.

    If you are trying to say that an Amnesty International report is equal to a Newsweek article by Douglas Main, now’s the time to say so. And if you do, I hope you can support your claim. Otherwise I will continue to refer you to AI reports.

    I never said that one of my links meant it was the end of a discussion. Now you are putting words in my mouth.

    Like

  10. A portion of my second sentence seems to have disappeared. I meant to say that I believed you would have felt flattered if your words were attributed to either of them.

    Like

  11. David, how the hell did Douglas Main get in here?

    I have simply pointed out my belief that one should approach reports, articles, etc., critically and intelligently.

    It is neither critical or intelligent to wave hyperlinks at people in the way that anti-fluoride people do.

    And it is nothing to do with the respectability or otherwise of the organisations involved. After all, if we can see that the respectability of Cochrane and The Lancet does not prevent rubbish coming out in their name surely we can apply the same sensible analysis to NGOs.

    As for putting words in your mouth. I wrote about anti-fluoride commenters “who think such links mean the discussion has been settled in their favour for all time. I have never considered such attitudes at all sensible.”

    But, yes, I do not think your undiscussed links are at all suitable.

    Maybe it would be better for you to deal with specifics rather than meaningless links – look what happened when I came back to you on your Al Jazeera link.

    Or better still, deal with the real content of my article.

    Like

  12. David Fierstien you would need a lot of work to prove Amnesty International is not politically-corporate active.

    Can you refute funding etc claims in this?:
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article32257.htm

    Like

  13. David Fierstien would you support this approach to democracy?:

    “When the colonel seized power in 1969, few women went to university. Today, more than half of Libya’s university students are women. One of the first laws Gaddafi passed in 1970 was an equal pay for equal work law.

    Nowadays, the new “democratic” Libyan regime is clamping down on women’s rights. The new ruling tribes are tied to traditions that are strongly patriarchal. Also, the chaotic nature of post-intervention Libyan politics has allowed free reign to extremist Islamic forces that see gender equality as a Western perversion.”

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/libya-from-africas-richest-state-under-gaddafi-to-failed-state-after-nato-intervention/5408740

    Syria cultre has been great for accepting the education of women.

    “Syrian Girl Partisan” also known on Facebook as Mimi Al Laham, who was linked in a vid on a recent URL I posted recently is of Syrian descent and has degrees in biophysics and chemistry. Is that a threat to you and your view for Syria? For if what happened to Libya happens to Syria, and you seem to be supporting that, then it will become much harder for Syrian girls to study.

    Like

  14. Syriangirl’s name is Maram Susli.
    Here is a study building on her work. I wonder if it one day may help with understanding
    http://www.web.uwa.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/439647/Chemistry,_Nanotechnology__and__Forensic_Chemistry_Honours_Project_Booklet_2010.pdf

    No.3 ” Reactivity in crystals and its relationship to voids and cavities”

    I wonder if it may one day help with understanding of the eye lens/cornea also dental hydoxyapatite and fluoride.

    Like

  15. David Fierstien

    Soundhill, your comment: “David Fierstien you would need a lot of work to prove Amnesty International is not politically-corporate active.”

    Have you had your medication today? Your bizarre claim that Amnesty International is a front for US propaganda needs no work to prove that it is not part of your conspiracy theories. This is a list of global AI chapters. How exactly would the United States control all propaganda coming from all of them. And since the US is often criticized by AI it is unlikely that the US controls it.

    Amnesty International Algeria http://www.amnestyalgerie.org
    Amnesty International Ghana http://www.amnestyghana.org
    Amnesty International Argentina http://www.amnistia.org.ar
    Amnesty International Australia http://www.amnesty.org.au
    Amnesty International Austria http://www.amnesty.at
    (Amnesty International Belgium)
    Amnesty International Flanders
    Amnesty International Francophone Belgium
    http://www.aivl.be
    http://www.amnestyinternational.be
    Amnesty International Benin http://www.aibenin.org
    Amnesty International Bermuda http://www.amnestybermuda.org
    Amnesty International Brazil http://www.anistia.org.br
    Amnesty International Burkina Faso http://www.amnestyburkina.org
    Amnesty International Canada (English)
    Amnistie internationale Canada (Francophone) http://www.amnesty.ca
    http://www.amnistie.ca
    Amnesty International Chile http://www.amnistia.cl
    Amnesty International Czech Republic http://www.amnesty.cz
    Amnesty International Denmark http://www.amnesty.dk
    Amnesty International Faroe Islands http://www.amnesty.fo
    Amnesty International Finland http://www.amnesty.fi
    Amnesty International France http://www.amnesty.fr
    Amnesty International Germany http://www.amnesty.de
    Amnesty International Greece http://www.amnesty.org.gr
    Amnesty International Hong Kong http://www.amnesty.org.hk
    Amnesty International Hungary http://www.amnesty.hu
    Amnesty International Iceland http://www.amnesty.is
    Amnesty International India http://www.amnesty.org.in
    Amnesty International Ireland http://www.amnesty.ie
    Amnesty International Israel http://www.amnesty.org.il
    Amnesty International Italy http://www.amnesty.it
    Amnesty International Japan http://www.amnesty.or.jp
    Amnesty International Jersey http://www.amnesty.org.je
    Amnesty International Luxembourg http://www.amnesty.lu
    Amnesty International Malaysia amnesty.my
    Amnesty International Mauritius http://www.amnestymauritius.org
    Amnesty International Mexico http://www.amnistia.org.mx
    Amnesty International Moldova http://www.amnesty.md
    Amnesty International Mongolia http://www.amnesty.mn
    Amnesty International Morocco http://www.amnesty.ma
    Amnesty International Nepal http://www.amnestynepal.org
    Amnesty International Netherlands http://www.amnesty.nl
    Amnesty International New Zealand http://www.amnesty.org.nz
    Amnesty International Norway http://www.amnesty.no
    Amnesty International Paraguay http://www.amnistia.org.py
    Amnesty International Peru http://www.amnistia.org.pe
    Amnesty International Philippines http://www.amnesty.org.ph
    Amnesty International Poland http://www.amnesty.org.pl
    Amnesty International Portugal http://www.amnistia-internacional.pt
    Amnesty International Puerto Rico http://www.amnistiapr.org
    Amnesty International Russia http://www.amnesty.org.ru
    Amnesty International Senegal http://www.amnesty.sn
    Amnesty International Slovak Republic http://www.amnesty.sk
    Amnesty International Slovenia http://www.amnesty.si
    Amnesty International South Africa http://www.amnesty.org.za
    Amnesty International South Korea http://www.amnesty.or.kr
    Amnesty International Spain http://www.es.amnesty.org
    Amnesty International Sweden http://www.amnesty.se
    Amnesty International Switzerland http://www.amnesty.ch
    Amnesty International Taiwan http://www.amnesty.tw
    Amnesty International Thailand http://www.amnesty.or.th
    Amnesty International Togo http://www.amnesty.tg
    Amnesty International Tunisia http://www.amnesty-tunisie.org/
    Amnesty International Turkey http://www.amnesty.org.tr
    Amnesty International UK http://www.amnesty.org.uk
    Amnesty International Ukraine http://www.amnesty.org.ua
    Amnesty International Uruguay http://www.amnistia.org.uy
    Amnesty International USA http://www.amnestyusa.org
    Amnesty International Venezuela http://www.amnistia.me

    Like

  16. David, if you put more than a few links i n a comment it automatically gets hedkl up until I can approve it.

    Like

  17. Soundhill, I am glad to see that internet access is allowed in the nut-house. But seriously, they really have to monitor the websites you visit.

    Like

  18. David I think they would apply a buddy system.

    Like

  19. David it is all so puzzling. I think it is very hard for activists to disentangle their agendas from corporate profit agendas.

    Salil Shetty, international head of AI spent 5 years at the United Nations Millenium Campaign. One of the things they have done is produce a “virtual reality” film about ebola. A lot of it is about praying to God and thanking.

    In this tale it seems almost as if it to be hoped that ebola spreads, compare laxity over ebola isolation with extreme measures to sell measles vaccination:

    http://www.naturalnews.com/049317_Ebola_patients_hotels_measles_panic.html

    Also please note UN have had to admit responsibility for spreading cholera in Haiti by having aid workers from a cholera stricken area dump sewage in the water supply. The benefit to the vaccine companies must be immense.

    Like

  20. Please compare the UN film, which seems to be trying to get people to overcome fear, which I think will tend to spread disease, with the effective Nigerian approach which does not get a mention:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-did-nigeria-quash-its-ebola-outbreak-so-quickly/

    Like

  21. David Fierstien | September 16, 2016 at 12:06 pm |

    “Soundhill, I am glad to see that internet access is allowed in the nut-house. But seriously, they really have to monitor the websites you visit.”

    Interesting that you favour ways of a repressive society, David.

    Like

  22. David Fierstien

    “Interesting that you favour ways of a repressive society, David.”

    Society, no. . . Institutions for the unbalanced, yes.

    Like

  23. Me:“Interesting that you favour ways of a repressive society, David.”

    Fierstien: “Society, no. . . Institutions for the unbalanced, yes.”

    Political abuse of psychiatry.

    Like

  24. Here we go, USA forces attacking Syrian army allowing ISIS to advance. Simultaneously Israeli forces are attacking. https://youtu.be/aHdknYHZAE4

    Like

  25. AlJazeera TV have been reporting USA saying it was a mistake. I doubt that will change the fact of the killed and wounded and the advance of ISIS.

    Like

  26. Please hear the United States Peace Council speaking at the United Nations on Syria.

    Like

Leave a Reply: please be polite to other commenters & no ad hominems.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s