Non-violence in the defence of free speech

I have always been a fan of nonviolent tactics in social movements. Being old enough to have seen the apartheid arrangements that existed in the US during the 5os and 60s and follow the movement to break this I have often wondered why the nonviolent methods used by Martin Luther King and his allies have not been adopted more widely.

In particular, it seems to me that the political situation in the US could do with some nonviolent political tactics at the moment.

So I was fascinated to see the video by Joey Gibson from the Patriot Prayer group. Fascinated to see the tactic being advocated now. But also fascinated to see the tactic being advocated by the founder of the Patriot Prayer group which is often described as “right-wing.” Even described by the US House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, California, as attempting to hold a “white supremacist rally.” Incidentally, Gibson is not even white – nor are many of his colleagues in Patriot Prayer.

It may be hubris on Gibson’s part, but he is claiming success for these tactics used in the recent Berkeley confrontation. He and his colleagues were beaten by extremists and had to be retrieved by police, but did not retaliate. They adopted a passive stance. He now claims this was instrumental and the apparent shift by the media, and some politicians, to recognise the danger presented by extremist violent groups like Antifa and their misleading charges that advocates of free speech are white supremacists.

If these tactics are having the success Gibson claims then I hope the success continues. It’s about time some sense came into the current political situation in the US and we should not denigrate these tactics just because we may not like some of Gibson’s political or religious views.

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August ’17 – NZ blogs sitemeter ranking

Image Credit: The Popularity of the Blog

Please note: Sitemeter is no longer working so the total number of NZ blogs in this list has been drastically reduced. I recommend anyone with Sitemeter consider transferring to one of the other meters. See  NZ Blog Rankings FAQ.

Every month I get queries from people wanting their own blog included. I encourage and am happy to respond to queries but have prepared a list of frequently asked questions (FAQs) people can check out. Have a look at NZ Blog Rankings FAQ. This is particularly helpful to those wondering how to set up sitemeters. Please note, the system is automatic and relies on blogs having sitemeters which allow public access to the stats.

Here are the rankings of New Zealand blogs with publicly available statistics for August 2017. Ranking is by visit numbers. I have listed the blogs in the table below, together with monthly visits and page view numbers. Meanwhile, I am still keen to hear of any other blogs with publicly available sitemeter or visitor stats that I have missed. Contact me if you know of any or wish help adding publicly available stats to your bog.

You can see data for previous months at Blog Ranks

Subscribe to NZ Blog Rankings Subscribe to NZ blog rankings by Email Find out how to get Subscription & email updates Continue reading

Fluoridation not associated with ADHD – a myth put to rest

Fluoridated water is NOT associated with ADHD: Photo by mtl_moe

The myth of community water fluoridation causing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is just not supported by the data. I show this in a new paper accepted for publication in the British Dental Journal. This should remove any validity for the claims about ADHD by anti-fluoride campaigners.

Mind you, I do not expect them to stop making those claims.

The citation for this new paper is (will be):

Perrott, K. W. (2017). Fluoridation and attention hyperactivity disorder – a critique of Malin and Till. British Dental Journal. In press.

The Background

The fluoridation causes ADHD myth was initially started by the publication of Malin & Till’s paper in 2015:

Malin, A. J., & Till, C. (2015). Exposure to fluoridated water and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder prevalence among children and adolescents in the United States: an ecological association. Environmental Health, 14.

It was quickly taken up and promoted by anti-fluoride campaigners – becoming one of their most cited papers when claiming harmful psychological effects from fluoridation. Part of the reason for its popularity is that it is the only published paper reporting an association between community water fluoridation (CWF) incidence and the prevalence of a psychological deficit. All other reports on this used by anti-fluoride campaigners are based on studies made in high fluoride regions like China where fluorosis is endemic. Those studies are just not relevant to CWF.

While many critics rejected Malin & Till’s conclusions on the simple basis that correlation does not mean causation I decided to look a bit deeper and test their statistical analyses. This was easy because they used published US data for each US state and such data is available for many factors.

I posted my original findings in the article ADHD linked to elevation not fluoridation. This showed that a number of factors were independently associated with ADHD prevalence (eg., home ownership, poverty, educational attainment, personal income, and % of the population older than 65) and these associations were just as significant statistically as the associaiton reported by Malin & Till.

However, multiple regression of possible modifying factors showed no statistically significant of ADHD prevalence with CWF incidence when mean state elevation was includedd.

The importance of elevation was confirmed by Huber et al. (2015):

Huber, R. S., Kim, T.-S., Kim, N., Kuykendall, M. D., Sherwood, S. N., Renshaw, P. F., & Kondo, D. G. (2015). Association Between Altitude and Regional Variation of ADHD in Youth. Journal of Attention Disorders.

Huber et al., (2015) did not include CWF incidence in their analyses. I have done this with the new paper in the British Dental Journal.

Publication problems

I firmly believe that scientific journals, like  Environmental Health which published the Malin & Till paper, have an ethical obligation to accept critiques of papers they publish (subject to peer review of course). Similarly, it is appropriate that any critique of a published paper is made in the journal where it was originally published. Implicit in this arrangement, of course, is that the authors of the original paper get the chance to respond to any critique and that the response be published by the original journal.

Unfortunately, this was not possible for this paper because the Chief Editor of  Environmental Health,  Prof Philippe Grandjeansimply refused to allow this critique to be considered for publication. No question of any peer reviuew. In his rejection he wrote:

“Although our journal does not currently have a time limit for submission of comments on articles published in EH, we are concerned that your response appears a very long time after the publication of the article that you criticize. During that period, new evidence has been published, and you cite some of it. There are additional studies that would also have to be taken into regard in a comprehensive comment, as would usually be the case after two years. In addition, the way the letter is written makes us believe that the letter is part of a controversy, and our journal is certainly not the appropriate forum for a dispute on fluoride policies.”

My response pointed out the reasons for the time gap (problems related to the journals large publication fee), that no other critique of the Malin & Till paper had yet been published and that any perceived polemics in the draft should normally be attended to by reviewers. This was ignored by Grandjean.

While Grandjean’s rejection astounded me – something I thought editors would consider unethical – it was perhaps understandable. Grandjean is directly involved as an author of several papers that activists use to criticise community water fluoridation. Examples are:

Grandjean is part of the research group that has published data on IQ deficits in areas of endemic fluorosis – studies central to the anti-fluoride activist claims that CWF damages IQ.  He has also often appears in news reports supporting research findings that are apparently critical of CWF so has an anti-fluoridation public standing.

In my posts Poor peer-review – a case study and Poor peer review – and its consequences I showed how the peer review of the original Malin & Till paper was one-sided and inadequate. I also provided a diagram (see below) showing the relationship of Grandjean as Chief Editor of the Journal, and the reviewers as proponents of chemical toxicity mechanisms of IQ deficits.

So, I guess a lesson learned. But the unethical nature of Grandjean’s response did surprise me.

I then submitted to paper to the British Dental Journal. It was peer-reviewed, revised and here we are.

The guts of the paper

This basically repeated the contents of my article ADHD linked to elevation not fluoridation. However, I tried to use Malin &Till’s paper as an example of problems in ecological or correlation studies. In particular the inadequate consideration of possible risk-modifying factors. Malin & Till clearly had a bias against CWF which they confirmed by limiting the choice of covariates that might show them wrong. I agree that a geographic factor like altitude may not have been obvious to them but their discussion showed a bias towards chemical toxicity mechanisms – even though other social factors are often considered to be implicated in ADHD prevalence.

Unfortunately, Malin & Till’s paper is not an isolated example. Another obvious example of confirmation bias is that of Peckham et al., (2015). They reported an association of hypothyroidism with fluoridation but did not include the most obvious example of iodine deficiency as a risk-modifying factor in their statistical analysis

Of course, anti-fluoride campaigners latched on to the papers of Peckham et al., (2015) and Malin & Till (2015) to “prove” fluoridation was harmful. I guess such biased use of the scientific literature simply to be expected from political activists.

However,  I also believe the scientific literature contains many other examples where inadequate statistical analyses in ecological studies have been used to argue for associations which may not be real. Such papers are easily adopted by activists who are arguing for or against specific social policies or social attitudes. For example, online articles about religion will sometimes refer to published correlations of religosity with IQ, educational level or scoio-economic status. Commenters simply select the studies which confirm the bias they are arguing for.

These sort of ecological or corellations studies can be useful for developing hypotheses for future study but it is wrong to use them to support an argument and worse as “proof” of an argument.

Take home message

  1. There is no statistically significant association of CWF with ADHD prevalence. Malin & Till’s study was flawed by lack of consideration of other possible risk-modifying factors;
  2. Be very wary of ecological or correlation studies.Correlation is not evidence for causation and many of these sudues iognore other possible important risk-modifying factors.

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From Charlottesville to Boston – a lesson

Participants in Boston’s Free Speech rally. Speaker is Republican Senate candidate Dr Shiva Ayyadurai. Not a Nazi or white supremacist in sight. Was the media feeding me porkies?

Funny thing – I have become more worried about the lessons of the Boston “free speech” rally than the Charlottesville white supremacist demonstration. Here’s why.

There is nothing new about fighting Nazis, neo-Nazis and fascists in street demonstrations. Many on the left did this, and did it violently, in the lead up to the second world war. It’s happening in Europe again – and, more seriously, in Ukraine.

Participants in genuine anti-Nazi actions are usually proud of what they did. It is one thing to attempt to get one’s head around the concept that freedom of speech should allow expression of racist views but I guess once the violence starts the moral issues become clearer.

So while we can debate the role played by anarchists, Antifa, and outright thugs on both sides in Charlottesville there does seem to have been an excuse there for moral outrage and the inevitable conflict is understandable.

But what about Boston? I originally thought the “free speech” rally held this last weekend was really about white supremacism. The mainstream media told me this. The 15 – 45 thousand demonstrators against the rally convinced me of this. I had absolutely no sympathy for those in the rally and identified morally with the counter-demonstrators. But I was thankful that police organisation prevented conflict – at least conflict between the rally participants and the counter demonstrators (fighting did break out between some counter-demonstrators and the police).

But I was wrong

I was misinformed by the media. It wasn’t until I got involved in a social media discussion that I decided to check out what was really happening in Boston. I checked out who organised the free speech rally and what their aims were. I tried to find out who spoke at the free speech rally and looked for videos of speakers and the whole event online.

In fact, the “free speech” rally organisers were not white supremacists or Nazis. Conservatives or “right-wingers” perhaps. But they do seem to have genuine interests in free speech and the various speakers represented a range from conservatives to Green Party members – and a Dr Shiva Ayyadurai, a Democrat currently standing for the Senate (See the video of his speech above). the placards were anti-Monsata and pro-Black-Lives Matter.

Here is what the Boston Free Speech people say about their rally:

“This Free Speech Movement is dedicated to peaceful rallies and are in no way affiliated with the Charlottesville rally on 8/12/17

While we maintain that every individual is entitled to their freedom of speech and defend that basic human right, we will not be offering our platform to racism or bigotry. We denounce the politics of supremacy and violence. We denounce the actions, activities, and tactics of the so-called Antifa movement. We denounce the normalization of political violence.

We are witnessing an unprecedented move towards sweeping censorship that undermines our democratic system. We are witnessing increasingly regular incidents of political violence being used to silence political opponents. We are witnessing our social media and online communities purging both progressive and conservative content from their networks. We oppose all instances of censorship. We believe that the way to defeat and disarm toxic ideas and ideologies is through dialogue and reason, and that attempting to silence any voice by force of mob or force of law only empowers the radical elements of society and divides us.

There is a lot of misinformation in the media slandering our name by likening our organization to those that ran the Charlottesville rally. THIS COULD NOT BE FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH! “I can tell you the march we had in May…That group pulled a permit, they worked very well with us” as stated by Boston Police Commissioner William Evans in a press conference Monday (8/14/17)

We are a coalition of libertarians, progressives, conservatives, and independents and we welcome all individuals and organizations from any political affiliations that are willing to peaceably engage in open dialogue about the threats to, and importance of, free speech and civil liberties. Join us at the Parkman Bandstand where we will be holding our event. We look forward to this tide-changing peaceful event that has the potential to be a shining example of how we, in the city of Boston, can come together for the common goal of preserving freedom of speech for all and respectfully discussing our differences of opinion without engaging in violence.”

So, in Boston we had a very small gathering (probably well under 100) exercising their free speech at a permitted rally in the Band Rotunda. (Yes, there were apparently more, including some of the programmed speakers, who couldn’t get through the crowd of counter demonstrators which had blocked of entrances).

They were surrounded by 15 – 45 thousand counter demonstrators yelling a stream of abuse at the rally participants – accusing them of being Nazis, etc. Fortunately, the police had manned a cordon to keep the two groups well separated. I say fortunately because it did remind me of those brave anti-apartheid demonstrators who had invaded Hamilton’s Rugby Park in 1981 to prevent the Waikato – South Africa Rugby game. On that day the police helped to prevent some of the violence.

An aerial view shows how counter-protesters vastly outnumbered a few dozen participants at a ‘free speech’ rally (rotunda) in Boston. Image credit: Daily Mail.
This brought back memories of how the police protected anti-apartheid demonstrators on Hamilton’s Rugby Park in 1981. Photo Credit: Daily Mail.
 My lesson

The presence of a small number of white supremacists in society is probably inevitable and shouldn’t concern us too much. Similarly, the presence of a relatively small number of anarchists and thugs who attend such demonstrations with the aim of creating violence is also probably inevitable. The police in Boston showed how this could be handled in a relatively painless way.

So these minor groups really don’t concern me too much. Nor do honest anti-fascists who attempt to close down white supremacy manifestations.

But that was not the case here. What we had was a huge crowd of counter-protesters who thought they were opposing racists and Nazis – but they weren’t. They were opposing free speech.

These people were misinformed and misled. Misinformed and misled by the mainstream media and politicians who insist on labeling proponents of free speech white supremacists.

Nazis and anarchists do worry more. But not as much as a misinformed mass movement.

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Hypocrisy, irrationality and wise words from Monty Python

I wonder how many others feel like me.

All the old sureties seem to have disappeared. Political words like “liberal” and “conservative” no longer mean what I thought they used to mean.

“Liberals” are attacking “freedom of speech” demonstrations. And those fighting for “freedom of speech” seem to be Nazis – if you can believe the media.

What next, are we going to see nighttime demonstrations of book burning by “anti-fascist liberals!”

How is one to think anymore. Or at least, to think independently and objectively and not simply adopting the slogans and group thought pushed down our throats by the media.

Even if all the wild claims being made by media and demonstrators are true – that those demonstrating for freedom of speech are “Nazis” “white supremacists,” or just outright “conservatives” – what happened to the old adage I was brought up with:

“I don’t for a minute accept what you say – but I will fight to the death for your right to say it!”

So in these days of confusion and lack of any reliable moral compass when it comes to understanding politics, I have had to turn to that one reliable source of guidance – Monty Python.

I have always enjoyed the “Galaxy Song” from “The Meaning of Life.” And more than ever I am finding solace in the last lines of that song:

“So remember, when you’re feeling very small and insecure,
How amazingly unlikely is your birth;
And pray that there’s intelligent life somewhere out in space,
‘Cause there’s bugger all down here on Earth!”

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Are we all anti-fascist now?

US neo-Nazis and fascists supporters march in Charoltsvill, USA.
Image credit: Alejandro Alvarez/News2Share via Reuters

Wouldn’t that be nice? What if the current almost universal condemnation of fascism by the main stream media and social media commenters were genuine.? That it represents an abhorrence for fascism and its modern supporters who attempt to revive it – and not just partisan politics.

Because fascism is abhorrent. And it does have its modern apologists, even revivalists. It is not new, even in the US, and people shouldn’t be surprised at its manifestation in Charlottesville.

After all, we have seen similar actions in other parts of the world – in parts of the world which understandably understand fascism and its consequences far better than the average US citizen does.

Thousands of nationals, neo-Nazis and pro-fascists march in Kiev, Ukraine, on the anniversary of the birth of Nazi collaborator Stepan Bandera.
Image credit: South China Morning Post.

Yes, I know. Our media tends to treat the marchers in Kiev and Riga as “freedom fighters” and not what they really are – supporters of  Nazi collaborators and those organisations derived from them which still exist today and play a role in the politics of those countries. But, unlike the USA, those collaborators were responsible for thousands of deaths of their fellow citizens(see my article Don’t put all the blame on the Germans – a lesson from World War II).

Supporters of Latvia’s Waffen-SS legion hold an annual commemoration Nazi SS division formed from Latvians during World War Two. Image Credit: The Telegraph.

 

Sculpture of the “Unbowed man” at the Khatyn Memorial site near Minsk in Byelorussia. The sculpture depicts Yuzif Kaminsky, the only adult to survive the massacre by Ukrainian Nazi groups, holding his dead son Adam.
Image credit: John Oldale.

Which brings me to my real message – my suggestion for action

Why not take advantage of this new-found anti-fascist feeling? Rather than let the lessons of Charlotteville disperse and die out why not do something meaningful and specific? Something that might last. And something with an international influence.

My suggestion – the US should change its stance next time the regular United Nations General Assembly resolution on “Combating the glorification of Nazism, neo-Nazism and other practices that contribute to fuelling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance” comes up.

The resolution expresses concern about the fact that in some countries, famed Nazi movement leaders and former members of the SS are honoured, and monuments to fighters (e.g partisan heroes) against fascism are demolished or subjected to desecration. It calls on states to pass legislation prohibiting the denial of crimes against humanity and war crimes during the Second World War.

It was last passed in November 2016. Then the only countries voting against the resolution were Ukraine, the United States and Palau!

Just imagine, if the US goes with its current anti-fascist feelings it could, at last, vote for this resolution. Of course, Palau as a client state will also automatically reverse its vote.

As for Ukraine – well, who could say the country is such a mess. Chances are the current government in Kiev may not be in power next time the vote occurs. But, unfortunately, the extreme nationalist and neo-fascist forces which seem to dictate affairs in that country will still be around.

But what about closer to home

Can not New Zealand also learn from the current anti-fascist feelings emanating from the USA? New Zealand traditionally takes the cowards way out and abstains on this resolution. Apparently aligning itself with the 131 countries supporting the resolution in 2016 would have caused too much displeasure from the USA – something we still seem to be afraid of. So we joined the group of 48 countries that abstained.
But, I guess, if the USA changed heart and voted for the anti-fascist resolution we would meekly snap into line and also vote for it.

A job for the US (and NZ) House of Representatives?

OK, the current US president may be even less willing than previous presidents to take a real international stand against fascism. But don’t we have some recent history that might provide a solution. Why don’t the US Congress and Senate follow on from their recent almost unanimous resolutions constraining the president in his handling of international affairs?

They made it impossible for President Trump to take any action on sanctions against Iran, North Korea and the Russian Federation without a decision from Congress.

So why not a near unanimous Congressional resolution demanding the USA in future votes for this resolution in the UN General Assembly? A resolution that prevents the US Ambassador from voting against it again without a decision from Congress?

Perhaps the New Zealand Parliament could place a similar restriction on our representatives at the UN

After all, aren’t we all anti-fascist now?

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Are fluoride researchers sacked for their findings?

Dr Phyllis Mullenix – employment terminated because of her fluoride research or other reasons? (Image credit: NYC Coalition Against Artificial Fluoridation)

Heard the one about the scientist who was doing excellent research but was sacked by her Institute because her discoveries shattered the prevailing “scientific orthodoxies?”

Yes, it is a common claim. Often made by activists promoting conspiracy theories.  But it is an easy one to make and it is always worth checking the facts in such cases.

Of course, the anti-fluoridation movement is no exception – they claim that a number of “anti-fluoridation scientists” have been sacked for their work. Here I will just look at one of these stories – that of Dr Phyllis Mullenix.

The Mullenix story

A few facts.

Phyllis Mullenix was working for the Forsyth Research Institute in Boston. In her time there, she researched several possible neurotoxicants but made only one study on fluoride which was published in 1995. The paper is:

Mullenix, Phyllis J., DenBesten. Pamela K., Schunior, A., & Kernan, W. J. (1995). Neurotoxicity of sodium fluoride in rats. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 17(2), 169–177.

This paper has become central to claims made by anti-fluoride campaigners that community water fluoridation lowers IQ in children.

However, this paper is not relevant to community water fluoridation because of the very high concentrations of fluoride used (0, 75, 100, 125 and 175 mg/L in drinking water fed the rats). That such levels are unrealistic was shown by her own report that “the 175 ppm level .  .  . resulted in dehydration and the death of 10 of the exposed animals within 10 days.” Half of the 21 animals exposed died within 10 days!

For comparison, the recommended concentrations for community water fluoridation are usually less than 1 mg/L. But it is interesting that when anti-fluoride campaigners tell Mullenix’s story they rarely mention the concentration she used.

Mullenix did lose her job at Forsyth. A unanimous meeting of senior staff members on April 19, 1994, recommended she not be reappointed to her position. She was a staff associate and employment was usually guaranteed for 12 months at a time. Renewals would have depended on several factors, including the level of funding the employee was able to attract from research grants. Mullenix was informed by letter on May 31, 1994, that the Board of Trustees had approved the recommendation from senior staff members that her appointment would not be renewed.

So, she lost her job – but technically was not sacked – just not reappointed.

Why was her employment not renewed? 

Anti-fluoride campaigners rely on books like “The Fluoride Deception” to support their conspiracy theories

Depends if you believe there was a conspiracy against fluoride research.

Here are some of the conspiracy stories that are floated:

Chris Bryson says in his book The Fluoride Deception:

“PHYLLIS J. MULLENIX. A leading neurotoxicologist hired by the Forsyth Dental Center in Boston to investigate the toxicity of materials used in dentistry. In 1994 after her research indicated that fluoride was neurotoxic, she was fired.”

This claim has been repeatedly presented in articles and submissions by anti-fluoride activists. For example:

She went from being a leading neurotoxicologist at a Harvard affiliated research institute to an industry pariah. This assignment and her findings ruined her career as a grant-funded research scientist.”

Dr Phyllis J Mullenix should be a household name. She was sacked for her work proving Aluminium and Fluoride act synergistically to damage your brain and that of your unborn child.”

Within days of learning that her study was accepted for publication, Dr [Phyllis] Mullenix was fired from the Forsyth Dental Center.  She has received no grants since that time to continue her research.”

Dr Phyllis Mullenix was sacked from the Forsyth Dental Center, where she was head of the toxicology department, for publishing research in Neurotoxicology and Teratology showing that fluoride can adversely affect brain function. She had been warned: “If you publish this information, we won’t get any more grants from NIDR” (from which the institute got most of its money).

And I could go on. And on. There is no shortage of such claims promoted as arguments against community water fluoridation.

But here are some facts.

I have gone to the legal document presented to the US District Court, D, Massachusett on November 13, 1996. These relate to a case brought by Mullenix against Forsyth claiming discrimination and retaliation for her legal actions.

Mullenix’s complaint:

“alleges that Forsyth discriminated against Dr. Mullenix on the basis of her sex, denied her equal pay and one or more promotions and retaliated against her for seeking legal redress during her employment at Forsyth as a Staff Associate from 1982 to 1994.”

The document, Mullenix v. Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children, is quite long and full of legalese which I would never pretend to understand. But it certainly makes clear that the complaint by Mullenix and the response by Forsyth have nothing to do with fluoride or fluoridation.

Fluoride is mention only a few times:

“Dr. Mullenix asseverates that no one at Forsyth ever questioned the quality of her work or that her fluoride research did not lie within Forsyth’s mission. (Docket Entry # 102, Mullenix Affidavit).”

And:

“Dr. Mullenix contends that Dr. Taubman “called Dr. Mullenix `hysterical’ because he disagreed with her research.” (Docket Entry # 102, p. 18). Dr. Mullenix recites Dr. Taubman’s alleged statement while explaining what she said to Dr. Hay during a conversation a few days after giving a seminar on fluoride research. According to Dr. Mullenix, Dr. Hay mentioned that “Marty Taubman in particular was very irate about the data that was presented …” and that “Marty Taubman had indicated that I was hysterical in my reporting.” (Docket Entry # 98, Mullenix Deposition).”

It appears Mullenix made the complaint about use of the word “hysterical” together with apparently sexist remarks made by colleagues (relating to clothing and the employment rights of women who had husbands) as evidence of a hostile and sexist work environment.

This document outlines the various complaints made by Mullenix – and clearly, they did not relate to fluoride or, directly, to her findings about fluoride. In fact, it says:

“Dr. Mullenix asserts that the only reason other than gender which explains Forsyth’s actions is that it acted in retaliation for Dr. Mullenix’ seeking legal redress.”

Mullenix took her initial legal action because she had been denied a promotion and subsequently claimed Forsyth had retaliated against her because of her initial threat of legal action if her promotion was declined (it was and she did take legal action) and then the actual legal action.

I have focused on Mullenix’s version here because they do make clear that her fluoride research and findings were not involved in any retaliation by Forsyth. The institute’s version, of course, seeks to justify their actions. While there is some reference to her research interest not coinciding strongly with the Institute’s interests, their evidence relates almost completely to salaries for male and female staff members, the responsibilities of the staff associate position that Mullenix occupied, and the extent of funding Mullenix was able to attract.

I have no idea of the legitimacy of Phyllis Mullenix’s complaints or the legitimacy of Forsyth’s rebuttals. Nor do I know what the final outcome of her legal action was.

Mullenix’s complaints could very likely have been genuine. Even today women do get discriminated against in employment and salaries. Their complaints are often disregarded or treated in a sexist way. “Uppity” women can face retaliation. And things are better now than they were in the 1980s and 1990s. It is very likely Mullenix was granted an out-of-court settlement.

But one thing I am sure of – she was not “sacked’ for her fluoride research or publication of her fluoride paper. Any complaint made by colleagues about that work would have been perfectly normal and expected – and she herself, at the time, did not attribute any retaliatory action to her fluoride research.

So, yet another case where it pays to check the claims made by anti-fluoride activists.

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Fluoridation and cancer

Yes, you have. And one lie is the claim that fluoridation causes cancer. Image credit: Have You Been Lied to About Fluoride?

We all know the phrase “Lies, damned lies, and statistics.” If nothing else, this should warn us not to take on faith arguments which rely on statistical analysis for their credibility. Wikipedia uses this phrase to illustrate the “persuasive power of numbers, particularly the use of statistics to bolster weak arguments.”

Unfortunately, the scientific literature is full of weak arguments bolstered by statistics. It’s another case of “reader beware.” Do the statistical analyses used really support the argument? And how good was the statistical analysis anyway?

Unfortunately, scientific papers with poor or inappropriate statistical analyses often get used to bolster arguments in the political field. Anti-fluoride campaigners do this all the time. I illustrated this for the “fluoridation caused ADHD” argument in my articles ADHD linked to elevation, not fluoridation and ADHD link to fluoridation claim undermined again.

Another paper often used by anti-fluoride campaigners is that of Takahasi et al., (2001). They cite this to support their “fluoridation causes cancer” argument. For example, the prominent anti-fluoride activist Karen Favazza Spencer did this recently in a Facebook post quoting from Tkahashi et al., (2001):

“Cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, colon and rectum… were positively associated with ‘optimally’ fluoridated drinking water.”

Well, how justified is that quote? How reliable was the statistical analysis used by these authors to arrive at that claim?

Takahashi et al., (2001)

In fact, their statistical analysis was poor. They considered only fluoridation as a factor. When we consider other likely factors the statistical analyses show no significant association between these cancers and fluoridation.

Let’s have a look at the paper and the statistical analysis.

The paper is:

Takahashi, K., Akiniwa, K., & Narita, K. (2001). Regression Analysis of Cancer Rates and Water Fluoride in the USA based Incidence on IACR / IARC ( WHO ) Data ( 1978-1992 ). Journal of Epidemiology, 11(4), 170–179.

Briefly, it searched for possible statistically significant associations between the incidence rates for a whole range of cancers and the extent of fluoridation. It used fluoridation extent and cancer incidence data for three US states and six US cities. Other factors were considered only for lip cancer where sunshine extent was included in the analyses.

I set out to repeat their statistical analysis, including some other relevant factors. However, the data they used for cancer incidence in 1978-1992 is not available on-line. But there are data sets available for more recent years.

Here I use the cancer incidence data for 1993-1997 taken from the WHO, International Agency for Research on Cancer publication Cancer Incidence in Five Continents Vol. VIIIThis lists cancer incidence for 58 body sites but I restricted my analysis to eight of the body sites for which Takahashi et al., (2001) reported significant associations with fluoridation.

Are any of these cancers significantly associated with the extent of fluoridation?

Well, yes, two are at the 5% level (p < 0.05) – cancers of the rectum and bladder. The table lists values for the probability p value produced by linear regressions. The p values for cancers at all the body sites considered is also significant – but only for females.

Cancer site p – Male p – Female
Lip 0.750 0.825
Oesophagus 0.427 0.285
Colon 0.090 0.146
Rectum 0.037* 0.048*
Bone 0.784 0.147
Prostate 0.639
Bladder 0.015* 0.031*
Thyroid 0.806 0.519
All sites 0.250 0.020*

Takahashi et al., (2001) found significant associations for rectum and bladder. But also for Colon, bone (male), oesophagus (female), prostate (male) and lip. This difference is not too surprising as I used a different, more recent, data set. Also, correlations do not mean causation, they can occur by chance (1 in 20 samples) and other factors are more than likely involved (see below).

Another difference is that I used simple linear regressions. Takahashi et al., (2001) transformed both fluoridation extent and cancer incidence to logarithms but their explanation for this is inadequate.  Such transformations are not normally applied unless there is evidence that a relationship is nonlinear.  Takahashi et al., (2001) did not give any evidence for this and there was no evidence for it in the data set I used.  Neither was there any evidence of patterns in the residual values from the regression analysis – another sign that simple linear regression was valid.

What about the influence of other factors?

One of the biggest complaints I have about the use of regression analysis in studies like this is that very often other factors are ignored. Takahashi et al., (2001) considered only sun shine extent – and then only for lip cancer.

I think the restriction to consideration of only fluoridation is naive. In fact, probably indicating a bias and a desire to confirm it. It is extremely unlikely that all, or even most, of the specific cancers considered have a single cause – fluoride. And it is unlikely that a single factor would explain all the variability in the cancer incidence data.

Also, fluoride could be acting as a proxy for more relevant factors. The ADHD relationship with the extent of fluoridation is an example. In my paper Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder prevalence associated with altitude but not exposure to fluoridated water*, I showed that fluoridation extent is significantly correlated with mean altitude. When altitude was included in a multiple regression there was no significant association of ADHD with fluoridation.  This suggests that, in fact, the fluoridation data was really a proxy for something else – in this case, altitude – which Huber et al (2015) reported is associated with ADHD prevalence.

I am not intending here to narrow down the most likely factors which are associated with cancer at all these body sites. I simply want to check how significant any association with fluoridation is when other possible factors are included.

Geographic factors are worth considering – not because they necessarily have a direct influence. But because they may act as proxies from environmental, population density and industrial concentration factors which could be important. So I included data for mean elevation, mean latitude and mean longitude together with the extent of fluoridation in multiple regressions of the eight cancers above as well as for all the body sites data.

Using adjusted R square values to test for a fluoridation contribution

Rather than attempting to identify significant correlations with different factors for different cancers, I used the method of judging what effect inclusion of fluoridation extent had on the explanatory power of regression models which included the geographic factors. Jim Frost describes this approach in his article Multiple Regression Analysis: Use Adjusted R-Squared and Predicted R-Squared to Include the Correct Number of Variables

Briefly, he describes problems with the R squared value:

“Every time you add a predictor to a model, the R-squared increases, even if due to chance alone. It never decreases. Consequently, a model with more terms may appear to have a better fit simply because it has more terms.”

Include more factors and you could simply be modelling random noise in the data.But the adjusted R-squared  overcomes this because it adjusts for the number of predictors in a model:

“The adjusted R-squared increases only if the new term improves the model more than would be expected by chance. It decreases when a predictor improves the model by less than expected by chance. The adjusted R-squared can be negative, but it’s usually not.  It is always lower than the R-squared.”

These examples below of multiple regression output including fluoridation and excluding fluoridation in the models illustrate where adjusted R square values are reported:

The table below lists the adjusted R square values for multiple regressions:

  • +Fl included fluoridation extent, mean elevation, mean latitude and mean longitude, and
  • -F included only mean elevation, mean latitude and mean longitude.

Comparing the adjusted R square values for +Fl and -Fl tells us about the effect of including fluoridation extent on the models:

  • Where the value for +Fl is larger than for -F then the extent of fluoridation improves to model more than would be expected by chance.
  •  Where the value of +Fl is smaller than for -F then the extent of fluoridation improves to model less than would be expected by chance.

Male

Female

Cancer site + Fl – Fl + Fl – Fl
Lip 0.170 0.242 0.685 0.649
Oesophagus 0.809 0.842 0.558 0.612
Colon 0.842 0.771 0.681 0.659
Rectum 0.357 0.455 0.616 0.692
Bone 0.451 0.527 0.625 0.700
Prostate -0.350 0.130
Bladder 0.860 0.863 0.530 0.606
Thyroid 0.434 0.544 0.801 0.824
All sites 0.622 0.676 0.846 0.865

The table shows that adjusted R square values are greater (red) when fluoridation extent is not included in the regression model for all cancer sites except the colon and female lip. That indicates that these cancers are not associated with fluoridation extent. That the simple regression results alone  for fluoridation extent in the case of rectum and bladder cancer (and all sites female cancer) are misleading.

The colon and female lip cancer are exceptions – but the fact no significant association was found for fluoridation extent alone (first table) suggests something more complex is occurring here. It could be that the selected geographic factors have very little role in these cancers and inclusion of more relevant factors is needed.

Conclusion

The associations of fluoridation extent with various cancers reported by Takahashi et al., (2001) disappear when we consider other more relevant factors. Therefore, the use of this study by anti-fluoride campaigners to claim fluoridation is responsible for cancer is misleading. Not that I expect, from their past record, they will stop doing this.

More generally this is yet another example showing that readers should beware of putting too much faith in simple statistical analyses reported in scientific papers – even those published in respectable journals. It is just too easy to use statistical analysis to confirm a bias.

We should all keep in mind the phrase  “Lies, damned lies, and statistics” and treat such reports critically. If possibly checking out the extent to which other factors have been considered. Even where significant correlations are reported we should check how useful such correlations are at explaining the variations in the data.


*The full text of this paper is not yet available as it is undergoing journal peer review. However, the full text of CRITIQUE OF A RISK ANALYSIS AIMED AT ESTABLISHING A SAFE DAILY DOSE OF FLUORIDE FOR CHILDREN, the first draft from which this paper was taken, is available.

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Local anti-fluoride activists tell porkies yet again

FFNZ confuses lack of low fluoride studies on rats with human studies

Well, I suppose that’s not news. A bit surprising, though, because they are claiming the absence of research on fluoridation and IQ – which sort of conflicts with the previous attempts to actually condemn and misrepresent the actual research on fluoridation and IQ.

Fluoride Free NZ’s (FFNZ) face book page is claiming:

Would you be interested to know that no studies have been conducted on fluoridated water at 0.7ppm to determine whether there is IQ reduction? The National Toxicology Program are currently completing research to fill this gap. You would have thought that they would have done this in the 1950s before starting the fluoridation program wouldn’t you?

There have actually been three recent studies from three different countries which have specifically investigated the claim of an effect of fluoridation on IQ – and, unsurprisingly, all threes studies showed there was no effect.

Here are those studies:

New Zealand

Broadbent, J. M., Thomson, W. M., Ramrakha, S., Moffitt, T. E., Zeng, J., Foster Page, L. A., & Poulton, R. (2014). Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand. American Journal of Public Health, 105(1), 72–76.

In fact, anti-fluoride activists in the US, as well as New Zealand, have campaigned against this study. Their major criticism is that the study also included the effect of fluoride tablet use. They argue that this makes the unfluoridated control group useless because many participants will have consumed fluoride tablets. However, they ignore the fact that the statistical analysis corrected for this but still found no statistically significant difference in IQ of children and adults from fluoridated and unfluoridated areas.

Sweden

Other critics of the Broadbent et al. (2014) study have raised the issue of experimental power because of the numbers of people in the study. This could be a valid issue as it would determine the minimum effect size capable of being detected. Aggeborn & Öhman (2016) made that criticism of Broadbent et al., (2016) and all other fluoride-IQ studies. Their study is reported at:

Aggeborn L, Öhman M. (2016) The Effects of Fluoride in the Drinking Water. 2016.

Aggeborn & Öhman (2016) used much larger sample size than any of the other studies – over 81,000 observations compared with around 1000 or less for the commonly cited studies. It was also made on continually varying fluoride concentrations using the natural fluoride levels in Swedish drinking waters (the concentrations are similar to those in fluoridated communities), rather than the less effective approach of simply comparing two villages or fluoridated and unfluoridated regions. The confidence intervals were much smaller than those of other cited fluoride-IQ studies. This makes their conclusion that there was no effect of fluoride on cognitive measurements much more definitive. Incidentally, their study also indicated no effect of fluoride on the diagnosis of ADHD or muscular and skeleton diseases.

Canada

Another recent fluoridation-IQ study is that of Barbario (2016) made in Canada:

Barberio, AM. (2016). A Canadian Population-based Study of the Relationship between Fluoride Exposure and Indicators of Cognitive and Thyroid Functioning; Implications for Community Water Fluoridation. M. Sc. Thesis; Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary.

This study also had a large sample size – over 2,500 observations. This reported no statistically significant relationship of cognitive deficits to water fluoride.

Incidentally, Barberio (2016) also found there was no evidence of any relationship between fluoride exposure and thyroid functioning. That puts another pet claim of anti-fluoride campaigners to rest.

Animal studies

So much for NZFF’s claim that “no studies have been conducted on fluoridated water at 0.7ppm to determine whether there is IQ reduction.” But, just a minute, they are quoting the National Toxicology Program (NTP):

“No studies evaluated developmental exposure to fluoride at levels as low as 0.7 parts per million, the recommended level for community water fluoridation in the United States. Additional research is needed.”

But they omit the next sentence from the quote:

“NTP is conducting laboratory studies in rodents to fill data gaps identified in the systematic review of the animal studies.”

The NTP is discussing the research with animals, mainly rats, where effects of fluoride on the cognitive behaviour of the test animals have been reported but the fluoride concentrations are very high. And NTP’s assessment base on the review of the literature found only “a low to moderate level of evidence that the studies support adverse effects on learning and memory in animals exposed to fluoride in the diet or drinking water.” Hence the need for more research.

As part of the NTP’s research, which is currently underway, there are plans to extend studies to low fluoride concentrations more typical of that used in community water fluoridation.

The high concentrations used in animal studies is a major flaw in the anti-fluoride activist use of them to oppose community water fluoridation. For example, Mullinex et al (1995) (very commonly cited by anti-fluoride campaigners) fed test animals drinking water with up to 125 mg/L of fluoride (concentrations near 0.8 mg/L of fluoride are used in community water fluoridation).

While it is unlikely that the NTP research will find any significant effects of fluoride on the cognitive behaviour of rats at the low concentrations used in community water fluoridation the anti-fluoride campaigners have their fingers (and probably toes as well) crossed.

NTP will begin publishing the results of their new research next year (see Fluoride and IQ – another study coming up).

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July ’17 – NZ blogs sitemeter ranking

SiteMeter “permanently retired.” Image credit: David Melin.

Well, Sitemeter seems to have finally died.

According the CurrentlyDown.com it has been down since July 5 and the image above taken from Twitter indicates it has been permanently retired. This follows many problems in the past so it appears unlikely to appear again.

My advice to those who have been using Sitemeter is to consider replacing it with Statcounter or a similar counter. Have a look at the NZ Blog Rankings FAQ. for advice on this. This is particularly helpful to those wondering how to set up sitemeters. Please note, the system is automatic and relies on blogs having sitemeters which allow public access to the stats.

So this month’s list is greatly reduced. At last count, there were about 45 NZ blogs on the ranking list using Sitemeter.

Here are the rankings of New Zealand blogs with publicly available statistics for July 2017. Ranking is by visit numbers. I have listed the blogs in the table below, together with monthly visits and page view numbers. Meanwhile, I am still keen to hear of any other blogs with publicly available sitemeter or visitor stats that I have missed. Contact me if you know of any or wish help adding publicly available stats to your bog.

You can see data for previous months at Blog Ranks

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